Author Archives for Rachel Maddock

1235 Marine Drive

We are excited to announce that 1235 Marine Drive, a new four-storey residential/commercial project in North Vancouver has gone in for development permit.

The new project on the North Shore is a contemporary expression of the history of Marine Drive and its rich ship building past, historically an early industrial neighbourhood constructed of brick, steel and wood. We researched local building typology and expression circa 1900, and used our research to inform two options showcasing these materials, examining approaches to breaking up the building’s massing while maintaining a sense of project continuity.

Some design features from the Architect:

  • The residential floors hang over the commercial units, creating natural weather protection without having to resort to tacked-on canopies
  • We widened the sidewalk and added seating to encourage the use of Marine Drive as a walking and shopping destination
  • It has the ingredients of an industrial warehouse (wood, metal, brick) but those materials have been designed for residential suites instead
  • Bright red metal frames reflect the high energy of busy Marine Drive

Sustainability in Design

Sustainable urban design is about more than innovation, it’s about survival.

On October 31st, the UN-Habitat (a UN program for sustainable urban development) released its 2020 report on World Cities, as mentioned by this article in ArchDaily. A central issue highlighted in the report is sustainable urban development. More people than ever before are living in cities, and reducing their carbon footprint will be a major factor in tackling climate change.

Sustainability is a big value for us at Proscenium, and we are thrilled when we get to work with clients who are passionate about it too. Over the years, MEC has made sustainability integral to its brand (more on this during Hugh Cochlin’s upcoming presentation for the Wood Solutions Conference).

One of the many features that makes the newly completed MEC Vancouver so unique is that it is a high-performance mass-timber building with high insulation and air tightness, designed to us one-third less energy than national standards. It is so efficient that the building’s mandatory connection to the Neighbourhood Energy Utility (NEU) is used to sell back excess energy to the system. The building is also LEED Gold and Salmon Safe.

MEC Vancouver on East 2nd at dusk

Other green factors include: a flat central “blue” roof that collects water then reuses it in the building’s toilet system, “green” sloping roofs planted with regional meadow growth, and the use of wood as a building material.¬†Wood construction (as an architectural trend) is a sustainable option because it has reduced embodied energy (it can be locally sourced) and the materials can be recycled after demolition.

Being sustainable never looked so good!

Green and Blue Roof for Water Collection

Interior Atrium (Showing Douglas Fir Glulam Columns, Spruce/Pine CLT Floor and Roof, Steel Omega Braces)

Cedar Wood Soffit/Column Canopy at 2nd Ave

 

 

Join us at the Wood Solutions Conference

On November 18th, Proscenium’s Hugh Cochlin (Principal) will be speaking at the annual Wood Solutions Conference (November 16-20) hosted by Wood WORKS! BC. This year all the sessions will be virtual.

 

Hugh’s session, “The Material is the Message,” looks at the connection between material and brand for commercial projects, with the new timber-frame MEC Vancouver building as an example. He will dive into the use of wood as both an aesthetic and structural choice, touch on sustainability concerns (is wood always a sustainable choice?) and give a virtual tour of the building and its innovative design solutions.

Register for the conference online.

2020 Excellence in Commercial Wood Design

We are thrilled to receive this award for MEC Edmonton Brewery District in Edmonton!

WOOD WORKS! Alberta / the Canadian Wood Council jury provided these comments on the building:

“Wood was used for structural and accent finishing pieces and the jury felt that this choice makes the project stand out. It is going above and beyond in a retail experience when customers are allowed to approach and interact with the wood. The entry canopy is impressive, the proportions of wood make a nice warm entry to the building, especially the wood doors. A wide variety of materials were used: glulam columns, timber clad canopies, CLT changing rooms. The structure is thoughtfully oriented to the south and will get the natural light bouncing off the wood surfaces.”

It is great to add this new award to our office and we look forward to submitting future projects.

 

UBC MacLeod underway

Out at UBC, we’re excited to see the renovation of the MacLeod building deep in progress! This gutting and renovation project on the electrical computer engineering faculty building is taking the building down to its basic structural elements to rebuild/reprogram/refresh for 21st century teaching.

We’re at that exciting turnaround point where we see the vision start to come to life…