Author Archives for Rachel Maddock

The Royals featured in the North Shore News

Our project with Chard Development in central Lonsdale, North Van has been featured in the North Shore News. “The Royals” includes a new 24-storey building and a fully renovated 16-storey building for which Proscenium is doing full interior design services.

The article describes the design intent, quoting Alissa Foss, PAI designer:

“Residents of both towers will be greeted by beautifully designed foyers and elevator lobbies with wood-slat feature walls and signature light fixtures. Inside the units, the interior design is soft and neutral, keeping the focus on the amazing views. The kitchens have elegant white cabinetry, chrome faucets, GE and Haier stainless-steel appliances and quartz-composite counters, which are echoed in the bathrooms. Warm-toned vinyl plank flooring throughout will complement anybody’s furniture, says Alissa Foss, interior designer at Proscenium Architecture + Interiors who designed the project. “We chose a design aesthetic with neutral tones that will suit all renters and allow them to bring their own style,” adds Foss.”

https://www.nsnews.com/real-estate-news/brand-new-rental-homes-with-luxury-condo-amenities-3124237

 

Study for a Local Kollel

Earlier this year, we developed a study for a new community centre building for a local Kollel. There are some great features about this project that we want to share with you!

WELCOMING FROM ALL SIDES

The Kollel is located on a site that faces the street on the west and backs onto the Arbutus Greenway on the east. The greenway is an ongoing City of Vancouver project to create a walking, biking, and rolling path that stretches from False Creek to the Fraser River in Vancouver.

The building’s design takes advantage of that configuration by providing through-connections and a welcoming appearance from all sides.

A MAIN HALL THAT FACES JERUSALEM

The volume of the main hall on the second floor is skewed in plan to reflect the direction of Jerusalem, and to differentiate it from the rest of the building as a space that exists in relation to something outside of the usual street grid.

The ground floor is designed to be a buzzing community hub with social spaces, restaurant and café. The second level houses the main hall and the third level has office spaces.

Meet Rachel, our Communications Coordinator

 

Where were you born?

Good old North Vancouver!

How did you get into marketing/communications?

Strictly speaking, sideways? I come from a writing and dance background, but I often find myself in marketing.

What class in school has proven to be the least useful?

African Dancing and drumming. Though it was an easy credit!

What is the best building of all time?

I feel somewhat underqualified to answer this one. I have a habit of entering every old church I pass when I’m travelling. I’d say one of my absolute favourites is Sacre-Coeur in Paris.

Best brunch spot in Vancouver is…

Somehow I never brunch?

You never leave home without…

Coffee

Your Great Escape would be to…  

Peru

What single piece of technology makes your life easier?

Bluetooth headphones

What is your spirit animal?

Probably a cat. I’ve been known to stretch…

What word do you have trouble saying?

I can’t seem to get “bagel” right.

 

MEC Vancouver in the Press

MEC Vancouver Flagship store seems to be the talk of the town! It’s great to see the project get some recognition for its various sustainable elements, from mass timber design to rainwater recycling.

Wood Design & Building Magazine, 2020: Print and Online: “Expressing a brand’s outdoor-friendly philosophy by building with wood”

Think Wood Blog: “Biophilic Brands: Can Wood and Nature Boost the Bottom Line?”

MonteCristo Magazine: “Inside MEC’s New Flagship Store: Vancouver’s Co-op Has Come a Long Way”

The Daily Hive: “New MEC Vancouver flagship store a showcase of wood construction”

 

UBC MacLeod: A Seismic Test Case





Our ongoing major renovation of The MacLeod Building, the electrical and computer engineering building at UBC, involves a complete gutting down of the building to its basic structural elements. Necessary seismic upgrades are driving the renovation, which has provided an opportunity to reconstruct the building to evolve its approach to 21st Century learning. As part of the assessment, there was consideration given to not just upgrade to current code levels, but to exceed those levels.

The motivation was to limit damage to both structural and non-structural elements of the building, which would extend the useful life of the building, further protecting the investment in new infrastructure and systems that allow faculties to keep adapt to new teaching approaches.

After many years of working with UBC on various renew projects, we are proud to be involved in this exciting and sustainable approach to campus facilities! Extending the life of this 1967 building designed by Thompson Berwick Pratt is an important step in preserving the rich architectural history of UBC campus.