Author Archives for Rachel Maddock

242 West 6th Site Visit

This beautiful heritage house at 242 West 6th is coming together, with the roof complete, windows in, and the shingle cladding being installed. The renovation/restoration project is about 80% built, with estimated completion for Spring 2021.

The project will really come together over the next couple months as attention is turned to tiling, millwork, painting, site work and landscaping.

The project converts The Witton Residence, formerly a single-family home, into a duplex, with a full suite in one side and an infill house on the lane. A site that housed one family will now house four, keeping in line with the goal of densification for neighbourhoods near downtown.

The project went through a rezoning and a heritage review. The design will maintain the heritage value of the house and its expression on the exterior, while adding a new addition that complements (but doesn’t mimic) the original cladding. Some original elements have been restored, including stained glass windows, existing shingle siding, a belly-band and bell curve skirt on the shingles. An exploration into the historical paint of the building confirmed a colour scheme of Comox Green, Dunbar Buff and Stratchcona Red for the window trim, which will be matched. The house has gorgeous views down the hill to downtown.

Happy Holidays from Proscenium!

Wishing you and your loved ones a happy, safe and comfortable holiday season, from the Staff at Proscenium.

Proscenium will be closed for the season starting noon of December 24th  and will reopen on January 4th.

See you in 2021!

Newly Registered Architects

Huge congratulations to Pamela Troyer and Teague Shinkewski, who are both fully registered Architects AIBC as of this month! We are proud to have 50% women staff represented at Proscenium Architecture + Interiors.

Pamela has a Bachelor of Design from Emily Carr University and a Master of Architecture from UBC. Since joining Proscenium in 2019, she has assisted with residential and commercial buildings such as Cook Street Plaza and a heavy timber carwash in Richmond. Recently, she has been working on the UBC MacLeod building, an institutional renovation project, and an ongoing study of the Massey Theatre.

Pamela comes from a diverse background, studying abroad in Sweden and focussing on Industrial Design at Emily Carr University. She is also an active member of Vancouver’s cycling community, racing road bikes locally and internationally since 2016.

Teague joined Proscenium in 2016. Her design sensibility, attention to detail, and effective communication skills have allowed her to seamlessly transition to various projects roles and team structures within the firm.

Teague values architecture’s ability to enhance positive social, emotional and physical connection with the built environment and aims to bring human-centered design approaches to the projects in which she is involved. Recently, Teague has been an active team member in the design, tendering and construction documentation of UBC’s Electrical & Computer Engineering Building Renewal (MacLeod Building). She has a Bachelor’s degree with a major in Industrial Design and Visual Communication Design and a Master of Architecture from the University of British Columbia (2014).

1235 Marine Drive goes in for development permit

We are excited to announce that 1235 Marine Drive, a new four-storey residential/commercial project in North Vancouver has gone in for development permit.

The new project on the North Shore is a contemporary expression of the history of Marine Drive and its rich ship building past, historically an early industrial neighbourhood constructed of brick, steel and wood. We researched local building typology and expression circa 1900, and used our research to inform two options showcasing these materials, examining approaches to breaking up the building’s massing while maintaining a sense of project continuity.

Some design features from the Architect:

  • The residential floors hang over the commercial units, creating natural weather protection without having to resort to tacked-on canopies
  • We widened the sidewalk and added seating to encourage the use of Marine Drive as a walking and shopping destination
  • It has the ingredients of an industrial warehouse (wood, metal, brick) but those materials have been designed for residential suites instead
  • Bright red metal frames reflect the high energy of busy Marine Drive

Sustainability in Design

Sustainable urban design is about more than innovation, it’s about survival.

On October 31st, the UN-Habitat (a UN program for sustainable urban development) released its 2020 report on World Cities, as mentioned by this article in ArchDaily. A central issue highlighted in the report is sustainable urban development. More people than ever before are living in cities, and reducing their carbon footprint will be a major factor in tackling climate change.

Sustainability is a big value for us at Proscenium, and we are thrilled when we get to work with clients who are passionate about it too. Over the years, MEC has made sustainability integral to its brand (more on this during Hugh Cochlin’s upcoming presentation for the Wood Solutions Conference).

One of the many features that makes the newly completed MEC Vancouver so unique is that it is a high-performance mass-timber building with high insulation and air tightness, designed to us one-third less energy than national standards. It is so efficient that the building’s mandatory connection to the Neighbourhood Energy Utility (NEU) is used to sell back excess energy to the system. The building is also LEED Gold and Salmon Safe.

Other green factors include: a flat central “blue” roof that collects water then reuses it in the building’s toilet system, “green” sloping roofs planted with regional meadow growth, and the use of wood as a building material. Wood construction (as an architectural trend) is a sustainable option because it has reduced embodied energy (it can be locally sourced) and the materials can be recycled after demolition.

Being sustainable never looked so good!

Green and Blue Roof for Water Collection

Interior Atrium (Showing Douglas Fir Glulam Columns, Spruce/Pine CLT Floor and Roof, Steel Omega Braces)

Cedar Wood Soffit/Column Canopy at 2nd Ave