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The Royals featured in the North Shore News

Our project with Chard Development in central Lonsdale, North Van has been featured in the North Shore News. “The Royals” includes a new 24-storey building and a fully renovated 16-storey building for which Proscenium is doing full interior design services.

The article describes the design intent, quoting Alissa Foss, PAI designer:

“Residents of both towers will be greeted by beautifully designed foyers and elevator lobbies with wood-slat feature walls and signature light fixtures. Inside the units, the interior design is soft and neutral, keeping the focus on the amazing views. The kitchens have elegant white cabinetry, chrome faucets, GE and Haier stainless-steel appliances and quartz-composite counters, which are echoed in the bathrooms. Warm-toned vinyl plank flooring throughout will complement anybody’s furniture, says Alissa Foss, interior designer at Proscenium Architecture + Interiors who designed the project. “We chose a design aesthetic with neutral tones that will suit all renters and allow them to bring their own style,” adds Foss.”

https://www.nsnews.com/real-estate-news/brand-new-rental-homes-with-luxury-condo-amenities-3124237

Study for a Local Kollel

Earlier this year, we developed a study for a new community centre building for a local Kollel. There are some great features about this project that we want to share with you!

WELCOMING FROM ALL SIDES

The Kollel is located on a site that faces the street on the west and backs onto the Arbutus Greenway on the east. The greenway is an ongoing City of Vancouver project to create a walking, biking, and rolling path that stretches from False Creek to the Fraser River in Vancouver.

The building’s design takes advantage of that configuration by providing through-connections and a welcoming appearance from all sides.

A MAIN HALL THAT FACES JERUSALEM

The volume of the main hall on the second floor is skewed in plan to reflect the direction of Jerusalem, and to differentiate it from the rest of the building as a space that exists in relation to something outside of the usual street grid.

The ground floor is designed to be a buzzing community hub with social spaces, restaurant and café. The second level houses the main hall and the third level has office spaces.

750 SW Marine Drive in for rezoning!

We are thrilled that our project at 750 Southwest Marine Drive has gone in for rezoning and in its starting phases.

The proposed building is an eight-storey, mixed-use building between Oak St. and Cambie St. in Vancouver’s South Marpole district. It is located on the southeast corner of Marine and Aisne Street, walking distance from the Marine Drive Skytrain station. The project, for Chard Development, offers office and light industrial space. Substantial set backs along Marine Drive create opportunities for landscaping and a pedestrian realm away from the busy street edge.

The project includes commercial retail space at grade, light industrial space on levels one and two, office space on levels three to seven, and a building amenity space on level eight with rooftop views. Enhanced end of trip facilities and additional bicycle parking are provided to reduce car demand. This building has energy efficiency as a primary goal and is targeting LEED gold.

Design Concepts:

  • The building is set back from SW Marine Drive, allowing for generous pedestrian and landscaped areas to act as a buffer to the busy street edge and for storm water management.
  • Diagonal paths to the entrance serve two functions: to create a direct flow from for pedestrians from Marine Station and create accessible entry from either direction on the sloped site.
  • The final step in massing at the eighth floor creates a north and south facing amenity deck with intensive planting. The eighth floor provides indoor and outdoor amenity space for the entire building
  • From the second floor up, the building is designed to take advantage of views to the north, up the slope across the Marpole Community to the North Shore mountains beyond, and across the Fraser River and Richmond to the south and west.

1235 Marine Drive goes in for development permit

We are excited to announce that 1235 Marine Drive, a new four-storey residential/commercial project in North Vancouver has gone in for development permit.

The new project on the North Shore is a contemporary expression of the history of Marine Drive and its rich ship building past, historically an early industrial neighbourhood constructed of brick, steel and wood. We researched local building typology and expression circa 1900, and used our research to inform two options showcasing these materials, examining approaches to breaking up the building’s massing while maintaining a sense of project continuity.

Some design features from the Architect:

  • The residential floors hang over the commercial units, creating natural weather protection without having to resort to tacked-on canopies
  • We widened the sidewalk and added seating to encourage the use of Marine Drive as a walking and shopping destination
  • It has the ingredients of an industrial warehouse (wood, metal, brick) but those materials have been designed for residential suites instead
  • Bright red metal frames reflect the high energy of busy Marine Drive

Sustainability in Design

Sustainable urban design is about more than innovation, it’s about survival.

On October 31st, the UN-Habitat (a UN program for sustainable urban development) released its 2020 report on World Cities, as mentioned by this article in ArchDaily. A central issue highlighted in the report is sustainable urban development. More people than ever before are living in cities, and reducing their carbon footprint will be a major factor in tackling climate change.

Sustainability is a big value for us at Proscenium, and we are thrilled when we get to work with clients who are passionate about it too. Over the years, MEC has made sustainability integral to its brand (more on this during Hugh Cochlin’s upcoming presentation for the Wood Solutions Conference).

One of the many features that makes the newly completed MEC Vancouver so unique is that it is a high-performance mass-timber building with high insulation and air tightness, designed to us one-third less energy than national standards. It is so efficient that the building’s mandatory connection to the Neighbourhood Energy Utility (NEU) is used to sell back excess energy to the system. The building is also LEED Gold and Salmon Safe.

Other green factors include: a flat central “blue” roof that collects water then reuses it in the building’s toilet system, “green” sloping roofs planted with regional meadow growth, and the use of wood as a building material. Wood construction (as an architectural trend) is a sustainable option because it has reduced embodied energy (it can be locally sourced) and the materials can be recycled after demolition.

Being sustainable never looked so good!

Green and Blue Roof for Water Collection

Interior Atrium (Showing Douglas Fir Glulam Columns, Spruce/Pine CLT Floor and Roof, Steel Omega Braces)

Cedar Wood Soffit/Column Canopy at 2nd Ave